Trans, premed, English tutoring, life saving, sarcastic, 26 year old guy with a thing for spicy food, Iron Man, writing, and coffee.

 

Never make someone a priority when all you are to them is an option.

Maya Angelou (via larmoyante)

nivalingreenhow:

when McGonagall finds out that Ginny is pregnant, and that the Weasley and Potter bloodlines will converge, she marks on her calender the day the child will turn 11 and that is the day she retires 

lokicolouredglasses:

fandom-universe:

kungfucarrie:

The most dangerous phrase in the language is, “we’ve always done it this way.”

"Come on, let’s mix it up!" The heart surgeon says.
"B-but we’ve always done it this way!" The other replies, "this is how you replace a heart valve."
"That’s the most dangerous phrase in the human language!" The first surgeon replies haughtily as he inputs a fruit loop into the patient’s heart. "This will be his valve. He will be a fruit loop in a world of Cheerios."


(taken from this post on the experiments of Harry Harlow)
This is serious business, because this is a large part of how sexism, racism, homophobia, rape culture, ethnocentrism, etc. continue to happen.

Also, the example of heart surgery has bothered me since the first time I saw this post go around.  Do people honestly believe the surgical field has been around since the beginning of time?
The surgical field really began to bloom and expand in the late 1800s.  Before that, there might have been some crude attempts to repair damaged organs or tissue, but nothing to the extent of what people see as modern surgery.
How do you think the first mitral valve repair happened?  Did they just go “this is how they’ve always done it” and not repair the valve? No.  Someone had an idea, and a willing patient, who in the name of medical advancement went through that procedure without guarantee that it would work.  And now surgeons are able to replace and repair mitral valves without cracking the chest open; they just use three small incisions (two on the chest, one of the femoral artery).  How was that developed, when the way it was always done was by sawing through a patient’s ribs?
Advancement is a key part of humanity, and what makes us different from a great many species of animals. We adapt.  We find newer and better ways to do things.
If you are so damn scared of change why don’t you delete your email account and write people letters for correspondence? Why don’t you use a telegraph machine to send people text messages?  I mean, wasn’t that the way we always did it?

lokicolouredglasses:

fandom-universe:

kungfucarrie:

The most dangerous phrase in the language is, “we’ve always done it this way.”

"Come on, let’s mix it up!" The heart surgeon says.

"B-but we’ve always done it this way!" The other replies, "this is how you replace a heart valve."

"That’s the most dangerous phrase in the human language!" The first surgeon replies haughtily as he inputs a fruit loop into the patient’s heart. "This will be his valve. He will be a fruit loop in a world of Cheerios."

(taken from this post on the experiments of Harry Harlow)

This is serious business, because this is a large part of how sexism, racism, homophobia, rape culture, ethnocentrism, etc. continue to happen.

Also, the example of heart surgery has bothered me since the first time I saw this post go around.  Do people honestly believe the surgical field has been around since the beginning of time?

The surgical field really began to bloom and expand in the late 1800s.  Before that, there might have been some crude attempts to repair damaged organs or tissue, but nothing to the extent of what people see as modern surgery.

How do you think the first mitral valve repair happened?  Did they just go “this is how they’ve always done it” and not repair the valve? No.  Someone had an idea, and a willing patient, who in the name of medical advancement went through that procedure without guarantee that it would work.  And now surgeons are able to replace and repair mitral valves without cracking the chest open; they just use three small incisions (two on the chest, one of the femoral artery).  How was that developed, when the way it was always done was by sawing through a patient’s ribs?

Advancement is a key part of humanity, and what makes us different from a great many species of animals. We adapt.  We find newer and better ways to do things.

If you are so damn scared of change why don’t you delete your email account and write people letters for correspondence? Why don’t you use a telegraph machine to send people text messages?  I mean, wasn’t that the way we always did it?

(Source: uvmsemba)

I just discovered a full Scrivener project on my computer full of research with an outline of the first few chapters and every scene in those chapters. No writing has been done in it.

This is interesting.

I wonder how I could have forgotten about that.

o-dawgtheinvincible:

sigmarikz:

certaflyably:

thirstingaintdead:

Top 3 phrases that’ll create sexual tension

  1. "Make me",
  2. "oh really",
  3. "is that so"

"prove it"

"What’s in it for me?"

"The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated 75 to 200 million people and peaking in Europe in the years 1348–50 CE."

Currently listening to: “Brotsjór” by Ólafur Arnalds.

bazcus asked
From the questions thingy. A, C, and X

A: I’m 26 years old. Turned 26 at the end of May, actually.

C: There are a few places I would like to live, and all of them are for incredibly different reasons.  The most immediate one is Houston, TX, and that’s because of my career and the fact that one of the most amazing people in the world lives there.  At some point, I would like to live in Seattle, because I love the rain and the slanted hills and the brownstones and all that coffee, and the fact that it’s kind of a writing mecca.  Also on that list is moving back to New York.  Albany would be nice, because it’s close enough to NYC to get down there easily, but it doesn’t have the cost issues.  I wouldn’t mind NYC, especially if I could get into NYU’s surgical program, but yeah, NY is on the list.

X: Celebrity Crush, huh?  I have a few. ;)  One is Zoey Deschanel, because she is absolutely gorgeous and funny and quirky from everything I’ve seen (interviews and whatnot).  Another is Robert Downey, Jr.  I mean, come on, he plays my favorite super hero of all time and really brings the character to life in amazing ways. Plus he really has that phoenix storyline which I connect to in both his life and the Iron Man comics. It’s amazing to see what he’s done, plus he’s gorgeous as well.  The last on this list would have to be Aaron Eckhart.  First of all, I’ve always had a thing for blonds, and bonus points if they have a strong jaw line; he has both.  Second, Harvey Dent was one of my favorite comic book characters from DC, and they really brought my favorite portrayal of him alive in the Dark Knight.  Aaron Eckhard did a brilliant job.  Also, he’s amazing in Thanks for Smoking and Black Dahlia.

everybodyilovedies:

zombietonbo:

I doodled a thing and didn’t smudge the shading and it turned out well?????????

LOOK AT THIS SEXY ASSHOLE

everybodyilovedies:

zombietonbo:

I doodled a thing and didn’t smudge the shading and it turned out well?????????

LOOK AT THIS SEXY ASSHOLE